Ann Shelton, Dark Matter, Auckland Art Gallery

Dark Matter is an exploration of the lens-based practice of Ann Shelton in which time, place, narrative, trauma and female authorship unfold in shifting and destabilising ways. Her engagement with the fragmented nature of the social body, particularly those of counter cultures, and those who are at the edges of culture both literally or as subjects in film or literature, has been the force behind major bodies of work from Redeye to Public Places. Other substantial works such as once more from the street and in a forest reveal the conceptual focus and psychological strategies Shelton brings in her dialogue with overlooked and unwanted histories. Works introduce clues to an uncertain narrative and they are destabilising in the sense of offering concrete clues to an unsolvable mystery.

Dark Matter includes new work created in the studio that reveals Shelton’s ability to recover the unseen and overlooked histories and bring them into the light of day. Shelton’s photographs are a locus for the unfolding of the deep investigations in which meaning always remains at one remove.

Date
Sat 26 Nov 2016 — Mon 17 Apr 2017

Photo Sam Hartnett
Photo Sam Hartnett
Photo Sam Hartnett
Photo Sam Hartnett
Photo Sam Hartnett
Photo Sam Hartnett
Photo Sam Hartnett
Photo Sam Hartnett
Photo Sam Hartnett
Photo Sam Hartnett
Photo Sam Hartnett
Photo Sam Hartnett
Photo Sam Hartnett
Photo Sam Hartnett
Photo Sam Hartnett
Photo Sam Hartnett
Photo Sam Hartnett
Photo Sam Hartnett
Photo Sam Hartnett
Photo Sam Hartnett
Photo Sam Hartnett
Photo Sam Hartnett
Photo Sam Hartnett
Photo Sam Hartnett
Photo Sam Hartnett
Photo Sam Hartnett
Photo Sam Hartnett
Photo Sam Hartnett
Photo Sam Hartnett
Photo Sam Hartnett
Photo Sam Hartnett
Photo Sam Hartnett
Photo Sam Hartnett
Photo Sam Hartnett
Photo Sam Hartnett
Photo Sam Hartnett
Photo Sam Hartnett
Photo Sam Hartnett
Photo Sam Hartnett
Photo Sam Hartnett
Photo Sam Hartnett
Photo Sam Hartnett
Photo Sam Hartnett
Photo Sam Hartnett

Pod cast about Charles Mackay: subject in the city of gold and lead

Check out this podcast I was interviewed for: Charles Mackay was the influential Mayor of the Wanganui Borough for 13 years until he shot returned serviceman Darcy Cresswell for threatening to expose a secret and was expunged from local history for almost 50 years.


Photobooks forum: Gary Baigent and Ann Shelton

Ann Shelton and Gary Baigent in conversation with Robert Leonard

Gary Baigent’s photobook Unseen City (1967) and Ann Shelton’s photobook Redeye (1997) are portraits of Auckland published 30 years apart. Baigent and Shelton discuss their work with Chief Curator Robert Leonard. In partnership with Photobook New Zealand.

http://citygallery.org.nz/exhibitions/unseen-city


Pictures on paper

This short documentary charts some of the key moments in the history of the photo book in Aotearoa/New Zealand.


Five photographers five minutes

Join us for fast paced highlight tour of the new major exhibition of New Zealand Photography Collected as five well-known contemporary photographers talk for 5 minutes each on selected works in the exhibition. The tour is part of the opening day events for the new spring season of Ngā Toi | Arts Te Papa. New Zealand Photography Collected brings hundreds of rare and fascinating photographs out of Te Papa’s storerooms and onto the gallery walls.


The Wireless: An anarchist with a death wish

Interview on The Wireless

“Suicide bombing is seen by most New Zealanders as a terrorist act that happens overseas. But 33 years ago, an anarchist punk blew himself up trying to destroy ‘New Zealand’s Big Brother’.”

http://thewireless.co.nz/articles/an-anarchist-with-a-death-wish


Talk and Film Screening: Hitler Oaks, Dark Tourism and Holocaust Memorial Spaces

Demented Architecture features Polish artist Zbigniew Libera’s Lego Concentration Camp Set (1996). When it was first made, Libera was accused of making light of the Holocaust. Now described by the Museum of Modern Art, Warsaw as ‘one of the most important works in contemporary Polish art,’ his sculpture has gone on to be celebrated for the sophisticated ways it works through the legacy of the Holocaust.

Following an introduction from exhibition curator Aaron Lister, Ann Shelton, Emma Willis and Miri Young give three short presentations on Holocaust memorialisation, contemporary art and dark tourism. They consider how structures and legacies from oppressive and horrific regimes echo through contemporary culture.

The presentations will be followed by a screening of Alain Resnais’s documentary Night and Fog (1955), one of the first cinematic reflections on the Holocaust, and Polish artist Artur Żmijewski’s The Game of Tag (1999), introduced by City Gallery’s Chief Curator Robert Leonard.


Among the Machines

Rhodophyta, A view across the Rangitata River Valley to Erewhon Station, from Mesopotamia Station, Te Wai Pounamu, Aotearoa, New Zealand. Single channel, HD digital video and sound, colour, 16:9, continuous loops, Blu-ray, 2013, Dunedin Public Art Gallery.